Sunday, January 3, 2010

Wild Horse and Burro Vision Statement

This "vision" is taken from the BLM Wild Horse and Burro Program website.

Concepts

* Relocate animals from overpopulated Western ranges to new preserves throughout the nation that would be managed and maintained to showcase the animals. These preserves would be acquired by the BLM and/or partners, and managed by the BLM or through cooperative agreements with partners.

*Designate popular public land Herd Management Areas with distinctive characteristics as National Wild Horse Ranges, National Monuments, or National Conservation Areas.
Control the breeding populations of wild horses on Western rangelands. Increase the number of animals placed into good homes with more flexible adoption tools.

Implementation

Nationwide Preserves – Create wild horse preserves throughout the nation, located in areas most appropriate for wild horses (primarily in the Midwest and East) on lands or interests in lands acquired by the BLM and/or partners, and managed by the BLM or through cooperative agreements with partners. Some or all of the preserves with Federal interests may be congressionally designated.

New wild horse preserves would be carefully located and managed to:

* preserve local or regional heritage;
* protect native or restored grasslands;
* develop opportunities for tourism benefitting local communities;
* enhance adoptions; and
* care for these iconic animals.

Treasured Herds – Designate popular Herd Management Areas with distinctive characteristics as National Wild Horse Ranges, National Monuments or National Conservation Areas.

Enhance any ecological, wilderness, scenic, cultural or historical values in these Herd Management Areas.

The nationwide preserves and Treasured Herd Management Areas could become popular destination spots for American and international tourists, bringing revenue and jobs to local economies and providing recreational opportunities.

Sustainable Herds – Use a combination of non-reproducing herds, fertility control, and sex ratio skewing to control the population growth rates of western herds on public lands. Place more animals into good homes by making adoptions more flexible.



BLM photos by Kurt Golgart

No comments: